A classic.

A classic.

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#humor  #nat geo 


Irven DeVore is dead.

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When Patients Read What Their Doctors Write

Patients are more satisfied with their care when doctors share their medical notes. But letting patients see what doctors put in medical records has long been taboo. That’s starting to change.

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nativeamericannews:

Ancient Spearheads in Pennsylvania
Spearheads and arrowpoints are found throughout North America. The types of spearpoints changed through the periods of history, and you can figure out how old a spear point is by looking at its shape and what it is made out of. Pennsylvania spearheads are known for the soapstone that was first used and traded in this region.

nativeamericannews:

Ancient Spearheads in Pennsylvania

Spearheads and arrowpoints are found throughout North America. The types of spearpoints changed through the periods of history, and you can figure out how old a spear point is by looking at its shape and what it is made out of. Pennsylvania spearheads are known for the soapstone that was first used and traded in this region.

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abby-howard:

ANOTHER ANATOMY POST! Only three vertebrate groups have successfully evolved flight: Birds, Bats, and Pterosaurs, which are NOT dinosaurs, and are an extremely diverse group of reptiles! Pterodactyl is not the only one. However, birds ARE dinosaurs. Avian dinosaurs!

Wings are not some extra structure you tack on to a creature and somehow the arms go away— they ARE arms. Think about that when you are designing creatures with wings and also giving them arms. That means your creature has six limbs.

Next anatomy post: The anatomy and evolution of DRAGONS. If you guys have any requests, feel free to send them in!

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cracked:

medicinalearth:

cracked:

Welp. It was nice being the dominant species while it lasted.
5 Animals Who Taught Themselves Human Skills

#5. Orangutans Are Learning to Spearfish
In 2008, workers at an animal sanctuary on the island of Kaja in Borneo noticed the apes hanging from tree branches and attempting to spearfish with harpoons, just like the locals do. In other words, the orangutans saw us using weapons to cause harm to other species and quickly realized how powerful and awesome that makes you feel. Look at that majestic bastard up there. He even seems proficient, dangling precariously above water that we assume is full of deadly piranhas, steadying himself for a lethal strike of laser-like precision.

Read More

This is not only amazing but very wittily written.

And it has an ape with a goddamn harpoon

cracked:

medicinalearth:

cracked:

Welp. It was nice being the dominant species while it lasted.

5 Animals Who Taught Themselves Human Skills

#5. Orangutans Are Learning to Spearfish

In 2008, workers at an animal sanctuary on the island of Kaja in Borneo noticed the apes hanging from tree branches and attempting to spearfish with harpoons, just like the locals do. In other words, the orangutans saw us using weapons to cause harm to other species and quickly realized how powerful and awesome that makes you feel. Look at that majestic bastard up there. He even seems proficient, dangling precariously above water that we assume is full of deadly piranhas, steadying himself for a lethal strike of laser-like precision.

Read More

This is not only amazing but very wittily written.

And it has an ape with a goddamn harpoon

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Monkey see, monkey kill: The evolutionary roots of lethal combat

jangojips:

Research from Prof. Mike Wilson on chimpanzee aggression published in NATURE and featured in the LA Times. This is the pop sci version. You can tell because it’s titled “Monkey see, monkey kill.”

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parentheticalaside:

theatlantic:

Who Dies on Everest—and Where, and Why

The mountain just witnessed its deadliest day, underscoring an uncomfortable reality: The risks of Himalayan expeditions aren’t shared equally among climbers. 
Read more. [Image: David Gray/Reuters]


I suggest reading this entire piece (it isn’t long). But here are a few choice quotes…

The most dangerous steps on Everest are taken between 18,000 and 21,000 feet, and they’re steps that many Western climbers are actually able to avoid—thanks to the Nepalese Sherpas they hire to help install fixed ropes, carry gear, and break tracks on the route to the top. Those who perished in last week’s avalanche were all at work ferrying loads of gear between Base Camp and Camp II. They were all Sherpas. 
…
There has always been a divide between Sherpas and Western summit-seekers, but these tensions have increased in recent years as Everest has become more accessible to unskilled-but-well-heeled climbers.
…
Melissa Arnot, the Eddie Bauer-sponsored American mountaineer who has summitted Everest five times, had a Sherpa die on an expedition of hers in 2010. Reflecting on this in 2013, she told Schaffer: “My passion created an industry that fosters people dying. It supports humans as disposable, as usable, and that is the hardest thing to come to terms with.”

parentheticalaside:

theatlantic:

Who Dies on Everest—and Where, and Why

The mountain just witnessed its deadliest day, underscoring an uncomfortable reality: The risks of Himalayan expeditions aren’t shared equally among climbers. 

Read more. [Image: David Gray/Reuters]

I suggest reading this entire piece (it isn’t long). But here are a few choice quotes…

The most dangerous steps on Everest are taken between 18,000 and 21,000 feet, and they’re steps that many Western climbers are actually able to avoid—thanks to the Nepalese Sherpas they hire to help install fixed ropes, carry gear, and break tracks on the route to the top. Those who perished in last week’s avalanche were all at work ferrying loads of gear between Base Camp and Camp II. They were all Sherpas. 

There has always been a divide between Sherpas and Western summit-seekers, but these tensions have increased in recent years as Everest has become more accessible to unskilled-but-well-heeled climbers.

Melissa Arnot, the Eddie Bauer-sponsored American mountaineer who has summitted Everest five times, had a Sherpa die on an expedition of hers in 2010. Reflecting on this in 2013, she told Schaffer: My passion created an industry that fosters people dying. It supports humans as disposable, as usable, and that is the hardest thing to come to terms with.”

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laboratoryequipment:

Stone Age Tools Weren’t African InventionA new discovery of thousands of Stone Age tools has provided a major insight into human innovation 325,000 years ago and how early technological developments spread across the world, according to research published in the journal Science.Researchers from Royal Holloway, Univ. of London, together with an international team from across the U.S. and Europe, have found evidence which challenges the belief that a type of technology known as Levallois – where the flakes and blades of stones were used to make useful products such as hunting weapons – was invented in Africa and then spread to other continents as the human population expanded.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/stone-age-tools-werent-african-invention

laboratoryequipment:

Stone Age Tools Weren’t African Invention

A new discovery of thousands of Stone Age tools has provided a major insight into human innovation 325,000 years ago and how early technological developments spread across the world, according to research published in the journal Science.

Researchers from Royal Holloway, Univ. of London, together with an international team from across the U.S. and Europe, have found evidence which challenges the belief that a type of technology known as Levallois – where the flakes and blades of stones were used to make useful products such as hunting weapons – was invented in Africa and then spread to other continents as the human population expanded.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/stone-age-tools-werent-african-invention

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marine-science:

Methods of coral restoration are being applied in many parts of the world, including Florida, Mozambique and the Caribbean islands. Fast growing, branching species are being reared by conservationists and scientists and used for “reef seeding” projects. 

"It sounds quite novel, but in fact its a science thats been around for about 30 years. One of the reasons why I’m drawn to it is because its a very active way to get people physically involved in protecting the ocean."

Photo credits: top, middle, second from bottom, bottom

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