Social media, self-esteem and suicide: Nations with more corruption demonstrate more social media, less suicide

In nations where corruption is rife it seems that citizens these days find an escape from the everyday problems that trickle down to their lives by using online social media more than those elsewhere. Research to be published in the International Journal of Web-based Communities also suggests that these two factors — more corruption, more social networking — also correlate with lower suicide rates.
Adam Acar, an Associate Professor at Kobe City University of Foreign Studies in Japan, reports that more than half the population of developed countries is now active on social networking sites, such as Facebook, Google Plus, LinkedIn and Twitter. The vast majority of users are English speakers, but research suggests that the adoption of so-called Web 2.0 of which these sites are part is widespread across the globe. Indeed, it has been suggested that the use of social networking is almost culture-independent, partly because the interfaces to the online systems does not, on the whole, reflect cultural boundaries.
"Culture is directly related to country-level social media use which may also be related with country-level self-esteem, pace-of-life, happiness, suicide rates, gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, median age and corruption," Acar explains. "In countries where people use social media heavily there is low suicide, high corruption, low GDP, high self-esteem and high respect for traditions. At the same time societies with low social media use rates tend to be older, less emotionally expressive, less happy, score low on openness and conscientiousness, have higher GDP and higher social capital."
[read more]

Social media, self-esteem and suicide: Nations with more corruption demonstrate more social media, less suicide

In nations where corruption is rife it seems that citizens these days find an escape from the everyday problems that trickle down to their lives by using online social media more than those elsewhere. Research to be published in the International Journal of Web-based Communities also suggests that these two factors — more corruption, more social networking — also correlate with lower suicide rates.

Adam Acar, an Associate Professor at Kobe City University of Foreign Studies in Japan, reports that more than half the population of developed countries is now active on social networking sites, such as Facebook, Google Plus, LinkedIn and Twitter. The vast majority of users are English speakers, but research suggests that the adoption of so-called Web 2.0 of which these sites are part is widespread across the globe. Indeed, it has been suggested that the use of social networking is almost culture-independent, partly because the interfaces to the online systems does not, on the whole, reflect cultural boundaries.

"Culture is directly related to country-level social media use which may also be related with country-level self-esteem, pace-of-life, happiness, suicide rates, gross domestic product (GDP) per capita, median age and corruption," Acar explains. "In countries where people use social media heavily there is low suicide, high corruption, low GDP, high self-esteem and high respect for traditions. At the same time societies with low social media use rates tend to be older, less emotionally expressive, less happy, score low on openness and conscientiousness, have higher GDP and higher social capital."

[read more]

shared 8 months ago, with 47 notes


  1. em-pa-na-das reblogged this from valdanderthal
  2. geekyapostate reblogged this from valdanderthal
  3. valdanderthal reblogged this from anthrocentric
  4. opp-sd reblogged this from educateandpenetrate
  5. educateandpenetrate reblogged this from socio-logic
  6. socio-logic reblogged this from anthrocentric
  7. runningwatertaps reblogged this from anthrocentric
  8. vickyvictoriamurphy reblogged this from anthrocentric and added:
    #social
  9. eoinhanlon reblogged this from anthrocentric and added:
    Interesting.
  10. rororphelia reblogged this from anthrocentric
  11. timecubed reblogged this from anthrocentric
  12. dubhlinn2 reblogged this from anthrocentric
  13. callernumbertwenty reblogged this from inspirement
  14. sciencesindschwer reblogged this from anthrocentric
  15. samarajournal reblogged this from anthrocentric
  16. culturalconnections reblogged this from anthrocentric
  17. inspirement reblogged this from anthrocentric
  18. absurdhowl reblogged this from anthrocentric
  19. radicalrave reblogged this from anthrocentric
  20. tfloscience reblogged this from anthrocentric
  21. anthrocentric posted this